Engine Crank Handle

stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser
I would like to have the the option of hand starting my 1930 Essex if necessary. I have never done it but understand the risks envolved. My question is new crank handles are inexpensive and easily found on the Model A Ford parts websites, does anyone know if they are pretty much universal and would those handles work on an Essex car specifically a 30? Thanks.

Comments

  • 53NamedGeorge53NamedGeorge Posts: 52Member
    I’m not sure I’ll be much help with Essex in particular but I am almost certain that Chevys, fords and dodges where all interchangeable . My advice would be to buy one off eBay for 5-15 $ and see ,if it doesn’t then it’s a good wall hanger. 
    Good luck!
  • stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser
    Sounds like a good idea. Thanks for the post.
  • 54coupe54coupe Posts: 792Member
    edited October 27
    Check your car first... I've seen them with two, or three drive pins.
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,316Senior Contributor
    From 1929 the cranks had a pin through them.  Prior to that they had a three jaw type. 
  • HansHans Posts: 185Senior Contributor
    The 29 cranks had a pin and a collar on the shaft. 
    The collar is  to support the crank handle in the U shaped strap under the front frame cross member.

    The 1930 / 31 crank handle has a cross pin to engage the crank shaft fastener and does not have a round collar on it.

    contact me and I can trace my handle and send you the drawing that you can use to make or buy one.
  • stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser
    Thanks everyone. Hans I sent you a message.
  • HansHans Posts: 185Senior Contributor
    Image preview
  • HansHans Posts: 185Senior Contributor
     poor luck posting things, but I am in the HET directory
    Hans Jacobsson
    Michigan

  • HansHans Posts: 185Senior Contributor
    1928 Essex had a three jaw end on handle to engage three jaw on crank shaft.
    They were not "pins".
  • HansHans Posts: 185Senior Contributor
    now  I see the image is not showing
    email me at hethajac1@hotmail.com
    leave off the het 
    then I will send info to you
  • stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser
    Will do thanks Hans
  • m_mmanm_mman Posts: 16Member
    "I would like to have the the option of hand starting my 1930 Essex if necessary. I have never done it but understand the risks involved."

    Hand cranks were for more than just starting. I have one in my 29 Cadillac and I cant imagine anyone trying to spin that monster. 

    They are necessary tool for setting points, timing, valves etc. Much easier to get an engine at TDC with a crank than the starter. 
  • stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser
    I plan on using it for this also. I made one out of half inch rebar with a pin through it years ago but it flexes too much so I need one that's hardened steel.
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,316Senior Contributor
    For turning the engine over I just welded a lug on a socket extension that fits inside the  crank jaw, and use the ratchet handle to turn the the engine over.  
  • stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser

    Thanks to everyone who replied to this thread. I was able to get a new inexpensive crank handle that was made for a Ford but found the end that engaged the Essex crankshaft nut was slightly bigger and when inserted far enough to engage the pins it was wedged in the hole fairly tight and I figured it would spin with the crankshaft if the engine started. So I cut the end of the handle off, got a 5/8” rod and a 1/4” rod for the pin and welded a different end on it and it fits great. But I found that as I'm pushing 70 I cannot spin it fast enough to start the engine. Had high hopes but I may just end up using it for the other purposes mentioned in this thread. I tried many times, even on a warm engine. My engine has good compression as it was rebuilt some years ago and starts quickly with the starter. I haven't put a whole lot of miles on it. I'll keep trying and post if I have any luck.


  • Jon BJon B Posts: 7,329Administrator
    You seem to be suggesting that you need to hand-crank the engine fast, in order to get it started.  I'd like to ask the experts (like Geoff) if that's true.  I own a '37, and -- using the accessory hand crank -- I've found it just takes a robust jerk to start the engine.  (Please -- no snide remarks about the owner...)  One-half turn will get me started, so long as everything is shipshape in the engine.  By the way, you DO know the correct way to hold the crank handle (in order to avoid broken bones), right?
  • ken1962ken1962 Posts: 317Member
    There is some fabulous YouTube videos detailing how to start 6volt tractors with correct hand hold and what not to do. They even show that you must compress the air by slowly moving the crack to the most compressed feeling then a quick sharp pull will start the engine rather than cranking past the most compressed part and trying to roll the engine around and somehow expecting it to start. Likewise check out the funny video of the uneducated trying to start tractors at shows using all the wrong actions by spinning the engine using brute strengh, wrong hand holds. You can start the most heavy engine if you have the correct technique. It doesn't require strength but 2 things. 1 a correctly tuned engine and finding the position of the start of the crank to quickly jerk the engine past the most compressed part of the engine. A point also to remember never crank a engine for tuning purposes unless you know the ignition is turned off.. Its quite easy to start a engine unexpectedly. Cheers ken 
  • stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser
    I have watched some of those videos on youtube for safety sake as I've heard the stories of broken thumbs. I rolled the engine around where the handle was at the 7 oclock position as that seemed the best spot to get a good pull. But I cannot say that was in the best position for starting. Still looking into it thanks.
  • stev1955stev1955 Posts: 151Expert Adviser
    This is probably second nature to some but my oldest car prior to this was a '68 Cutlass.
  • jjbubaboyjjbubaboy Posts: 866Senior Contributor
    Jon B said:
    You seem to be suggesting that you need to hand-crank the engine fast, in order to get it started.  I'd like to ask the experts (like Geoff) if that's true.  I own a '37, and -- using the accessory hand crank -- I've found it just takes a robust jerk to start the engine.  (Please -- no snide remarks about the owner...)  One-half turn will get me started, so long as everything is shipshape in the engine.  By the way, you DO know the correct way to hold the crank handle (in order to avoid broken bones), right?

    Now, thats funny right there!
    My wife thinks, at times, that I would qualify!!  :open_mouth:
  • strangeplantstrangeplant Posts: 100Member
    Crank specs are all engine model dependant, and not year. For example, my 1928 F-head engine takes the same crank as a 1930 F-head engine.
  • paulrhd29nzpaulrhd29nz Posts: 253Member
    No F- head in 1930. 27,28,29 only for the hudson F-head. 
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