Routine 70 year maintenance, 1929 Essex

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Comments

  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    54coupe said:
    Great progress
    Thanks!
    You had a vital part in it!
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    Jon B said:
    Is someone making repro floor mats for the 29's?  If so, I'd like to add to my Hudson Repro Parts webpage.
    I sent a mat in respectable condition 6 months ago. I was able to successfully remove it without shattering due to our sweltering hot afternoons. I believe that there is some delay with it’s production due to Covid. Mr. Lynch is handling it and they are going to add material around the perimeter so that it will fit all models, not just the coupe.

    I’m so pleased to be doing this for other 1929 Essex owners and I’m sure he will be making them available soon.
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    ESSX28-1 said:
    Can you not restore the existing leather with a reputable leather restoring cream? It looks good enough unless there are unseen tears. That's what we did with my rumble seat cushion.
    After the application of some leather conditioner the seat covers because very supple. For the time being I am going to leave them original and just be extremely careful with them.
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    I got a chance to help out with templates but since  the rear one was a little daunting I put it off. 
    So today I got off my lazy duff and went to ripping seams and making a set for the rear. I didn’t want to pack it up and delay it further and forget the sequence. Besides I love an excuse to use my circa 1911 Davis Vertical feed treadle machine. 




    First I stitched the saddle to the tongue



     Next the other end stitches to the top half of the gaiter. Stopping to leave room to insert the saddle into the stitch. 










    The saddle is stitched on by folding the tongue up at a right angle. 




    The bottom half is stitched on along the passenger side 





    Here’s the end cover pinned in place, ready to be stitched clockwise.  Then join both halves of the gaiter, running down to join the other half of the saddle. 
    I’m going to stitch on the heavier leather of the end cap on the 1908 Singer patcher at my home in town because it easily plows through heavy leather. 
    I have eyelets on order and will get the right color cording. 

  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    ESSX28-1 said:
    Can you not restore the existing leather with a reputable leather restoring cream? It looks good enough unless there are unseen tears. That's what we did with my rumble seat cushion.
    After the application of some leather conditioner the seat covers because very supple. For the time being I am going to leave them original and just be extremely careful with them.



    Here’s how they turned out...

  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member

    I figured three different colors of thread doesn’t matter since it’s going to get greasy eventually anyway...


      

    The bobbin thread broke twice and the top stitch once before I re familiarized myself with how everything works on the 1908 Singer “patcher”. Like all good machinery it can be lubricated and I typically do it with each use. 
    There are two ears like a wing nut, that control the walking foot which rotates 360 degrees. This makes it ideal for patching since there’s no need to rotate the work.  Hence the nickname Patcher. 









    Halfway around...

    The eyelets and set tool came and dad’s teeny anvil came in handy for the job. I have yet to remove the front boot in order to set the eyelets, at which time both boots will be dyed black. 




    Unfortunately I made the seam closer to 3/16, than 1/8” but if it fits over the arm I will just trim the edge around the circumference so it won’t bother me. 



    I also realized, too late, that the rough side of the end cap is facing outwards. Either way it keeps the sand out. 




    I’ll finish out the rest of the stitches back on the Davis Vertical feed. 
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