Making a door for a 1933 T8 convertible

bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
At some point the driver's door on this car was replaced with what looked like maybe a Model A door.  They leaded over the old door handle latch.  Created the upper and lower belt lines out of solid lead.  I think the only thing I could use was were the hinges, which needed repaired, and the trim across the top?  Can't remember.  But it was bad.  When you closed the door, the top of the door stuck out about three quarters of an inch as you can see in the pictures. Anyhow, I had to make the inside and outside skin, replace the internal parts with the good correct pieces.

Comments

  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    Luckily the passenger door was good enough to pattern and reverse all of the patterns.  I decided to make the inside in a few pieces so I could handle them easier when making the little details, then weld the pieces all together and start fitting the mechanical do-dads, the door latch, window mechanism, etc..
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    I made the inner structure and repaired the B-pillar jamb where the hinges mount.  Got the correct window regulators and latches.  Turns out the back doors on a four door sedan of 1935, I think it was, is the same.  But you have to change the left side to the right, right to left.  The latches just had a different handle mounting.  As a bonus, the back doors on the '35 weren't used much, so they were like new.  The original hinges are riveted in.  I replaced the rivets with carriage bolts and slotted the holes for some adjustability.  I turned the heads to look like original rivets.
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    Mocked up the window to make sure everything worked right.  The pictures of the brackets are things I had to make.  I copied the passenger door and made the door hinge reinforcement pieces and the other brackets limit the window both up and down.  So when you roll the window down it comes down level and even with the top of the door.  When you roll the window up it stops even with the bottom of the top.  Once everything looked right I primed the inside.  Now time for the skin.  But how do you know what shape to make it?
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    I decided to make a buck to give me the shape of the door skin.  A buck that would bolt onto the door so I could check the fit on the car, or remove the buck and work on the fit on a work bench.  Saw horses with a piece of plywood on top is my work bench. :)  The door skin was shaped on an English Wheel.  The beading was done on the Pullmax.
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    The belt line bead and the top of the door were next.  After it was all welded up, I rolled the window all the way down to make sure it stopped flush with the top of the door, and rolled up right as well. 
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    Getting ready to go to upholstery and back again.
  • ESSX28-1ESSX28-1 Posts: 1,349Senior Contributor
    Beautiful work!!
  • PaulButlerPaulButler Posts: 831Administrator
    I really want to get the "Like" function working on this site however like is not a strong enough word for the work that Perry does! Absolutely flipping magnificent.

    It makes me want to get a car that needs work and ship it out to you :) However I recjkon you've got enough to keep you busy!

    I like the "looks like they used a Model A door" comment as well , that shows some ingenuity there
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    Great!  Glad you guys are enjoying the pictures. :)  While we are on the subject, I had to do some repairs on the other door as well.  But just the standard rust repair kind of thing for the most part.  I did however make a small buck for that repair.  The bottom of the body through the door isn't straight and flat.  I wanted to make sure the body flowed through this area.  Also, the hinges had been drilled out and pretty badly abused.
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    The running boards had been covered in material, a white diamond tuck and roll.  So a bunch of holes were drilled in them.  Plus, they had been repaired a few times.  Cut in half and welded back together, then leaded over in one place.  They didn't fit the fender or at the rocker.  Better to start over.
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    I noticed the rocker had a cut out for clearance of the running board support bracket.  But it only had one bracket at the front.  The rear of the rocker/running board had the cut out but no support.  So I put one in.  This should make the running boards plenty strong if someone does stand on the running board.  Though, I always step over them because I don't want to scuff the rubber. :)
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    The running board support brackets.  I had two originals, and made the other two.  By doing it this way I could make the height just right without any weird looking shims or anything under the running boards.  Made four new brackets under the running board to bolt them together. 
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    That's about all for the running boards.  Now they fit all the way around.  Bolt together easily on the car, without forcing anything.
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    Mounted on the car.  I installed a "C" channel piece long ways for support too.  A few pictures after I curved the channel, before I welded it under the running board.
  • 40indianssgmailcom40indianssgmailcom Posts: 78Senior Contributor
    Just wondering where to get the wood magnets as used on the door skin buck.  I have looked for years to find wood magnets also how about for non ferrous metals, (aluminum especially).  Nice craftsmanship. A friend has yoder(WW2 vintage), Pullmax, planishing hammer, etc amazing what can be accomplished with tools
  • bent metalbent metal Posts: 1,548Senior Contributor
    Just wondering where to get the wood magnets as used on the door skin buck.  I have looked for years to find wood magnets also how about for non ferrous metals, (aluminum especially).  Nice craftsmanship. A friend has yoder(WW2 vintage), Pullmax, planishing hammer, etc amazing what can be accomplished with tools

    The magnets are facing each other.  Pulling toward each other.  Yes, that will work through aluminum as well, if it's not too thick. 
  • terraplane8terraplane8 Posts: 505Senior Contributor
    Really enjoying your posts here, you must find it very satisfying to do this fine work! I guess that shows in the results, great to see the body coming up so nice.

  • 33kc198933kc1989 Posts: 369Senior Contributor
    Your work is amazing. A true craftsman.  
  • 33ET8conv33ET8conv Posts: 40Member
    Love seeing what you did. It is a work of art.
  • VicTor ZVicTor Z Posts: 637Senior Contributor
    edited April 29
    YES! It's a work of "ART"! AKA "Bent Metal"
  • VicTor ZVicTor Z Posts: 637Senior Contributor
    Great Work as always!
Sign In or Register to comment.