Hudson eight 34 crankcase bolt

JACK356JACK356 Posts: 205Member
Tapez votrI recently dismantled the housing of my Hudson survivor of 34.This vehicle has never been disassembled I precise. I have removed the crankcase; cleaned and repainted. I removed the bolts which was very greasy. While cleaning; I realized that 6 of the bolts had a brass washer and the others did not. Do they have to be mounted in a well-specified place? If you could answer my question;thank youe message














Comments

  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,316Senior Contributor
    The bolts that screw into the front and rear main bearing caps, and the two longer bolts on the right hand side that hold the oil intake pipe bracket have brass washers, not spring washers. 
  • JACK356JACK356 Posts: 205Member
    Thanks for the quick response. Top of top
  • Old Fogey UKOld Fogey UK Posts: 780Expert Adviser
    Geoff said:
    The bolts that screw into the front and rear main bearing caps, and the two longer bolts on the right hand side that hold the oil intake pipe bracket have brass washers, not spring washers. 
    I haven't used brass washers in those locations, Geoff. Is that why I'm having oil leaks ?
    By the way, have you received the hubcaps yet ?
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,316Senior Contributor
    Probably, the oil leaks down the threads.  No have not received caps.  
  • Old Fogey UKOld Fogey UK Posts: 780Expert Adviser
    Geoff said:
    Probably, the oil leaks down the threads.  No have not received caps.  
    Would copper washers on all the bolts stop oil leaks ?
    The UK-NZ mail must be awfully slow ! Please let me know when they arrive.
  • bob wardbob ward Posts: 1,301Senior Contributor
    The copper washers theoretically provide a perfect seal between the head of the bolt and the oil pan, stopping any oil that leaks down the bolt threads. A spring washer can never provide a perfect seal the way a copper washer does.
  • Old Fogey UKOld Fogey UK Posts: 780Expert Adviser
    Thanks, Bob.
    This weekend, I'll go around the pan putting a copper washer on each bolt in turn and see if that stops the leaks.
  • JACK356JACK356 Posts: 205Member
    And personally I will put net sealing loctite
  • Old Fogey UKOld Fogey UK Posts: 780Expert Adviser
    JACK356 said:
    And personally I will put net sealing loctite
    A good idea !
  • JACK356JACK356 Posts: 205Member
    JACK356 said:
    And personally I will put net sealing loctite
    A good idea !
     :smiley:  
  • ToddhToddh Posts: 167Member
    I would just point out that as far as I know, none of the perimeter oil pan bolts are directly exposed to the inside of the oil pan.  If you have leaks, the pan is warped or bent, gaskets are not installed correctly, the oil drain is partially blocked by sealant or (as in my case with my 34 212), you may have a pin hole leak in the pan.  As Geoff indicated, the two areas needing extra support are either side of the oil drain at the rear main and either side of the oil pickup.  And at least on the 212, those bolts are not exposed to the oil gallery either.  Bottom line is you don’t necessarily need any washers anywhere else on the oil pan unless you have warpage issues with your oil pan in which case a standard steel washer will help. 
  • JACK356JACK356 Posts: 205Member
    sealing threads on the bolts concerned of course ...
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,316Senior Contributor
    Sorry to disagree, but the front bearing cap bolts are directly into the interior of the crankcase.  Try leaving one out and see how much oil pours out.  
  • JACK356JACK356 Posts: 205Member
    Geoff said:
    Sorry to disagree, but the front bearing cap bolts are directly into the interior of the crankcase.  Try leaving one out and see how much oil pours out.  
    And for security. Loctite sealing leaks in addition :)
  • Old Fogey UKOld Fogey UK Posts: 780Expert Adviser
    Having crawled under the car on Sunday but not put any fresh washers on, the main leak seems to be from the drain plug.
    So I will temporarily drain the oil and fit a copper washer and then put the oil back in (it has only done about 25 miles).
     I read that you can PTFE tape on oil pan plugs - is this correct ?
  • Old Fogey UKOld Fogey UK Posts: 780Expert Adviser
    Anyone know the torque setting for oil pan bolts, please ?
  • bob wardbob ward Posts: 1,301Senior Contributor
    15 to 20 ftlb
  • ToddhToddh Posts: 167Member
    I was just inside both my ‘34 and ‘46 212’s and they are not exposed to the oil chamber, Geoff. 

    Geoff said:
    Sorry to disagree, but the front bearing cap bolts are directly into the interior of the crankcase.  Try leaving one out and see how much oil pours out.  

  • JACK356JACK356 Posts: 205Member
    bob ward said:
    15 to 20 ftlb
    What does it look like in newton metre? Thank you
  • ToddhToddh Posts: 167Member
    Toddh said:
    I was just inside both my ‘34 and ‘46 212’s and they are not exposed to the oil chamber, Geoff. 

    Geoff said:
    Sorry to disagree, but the front bearing cap bolts are directly into the interior of the crankcase.  Try leaving one out and see how much oil pours out.  

    I reread your post, Geoff.  You’re correct on the two bearing cap bolts.  However, they do not (at least on the 212’s) secure the oil pan to the block and I’m quite certain they do not on the 254 8-cylinder engines either. There’s a notch or cutout for each of the two front bearing cap bolts in the pan to accommodate them.  I stand by my statement that none of the oil pan bolts are exposed to the oil chamber. I hope that clears this matter up. 
  • bob wardbob ward Posts: 1,301Senior Contributor
    1 ftlb equals 1.4Nm, so 21 to 28Nm for the oil pan bolts.
  • Old Fogey UKOld Fogey UK Posts: 780Expert Adviser
    The Railton Owners Club have said in their latest magazine that they're going to make metal reinforcing strips for oil pans that will require slightly longer bolts but will flatten out warps in the pan and tray flanges caused by over-tightening the bolts and help stop oil leaks.
    I've put my name down for a set.
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