Using slide hammer style of hub puller.

Jon BJon B Posts: 7,420Administrator
Has anyone successfully used a slide hammer hub puller?  I've only used the kind with the three arms and "dog bone" that you whack with a heavy hammer, but my hub (or brake drum, if you like) is going to require more force than that.

I went to the nearest AutoZone and "rented" (for free!) their slide hammer today, but I haven't tried it out yet.  I want to be sure I'm not going to break anything by using it. (The slide hammer is bolted to the brake drum and pulls it outward, off the axle.)

I'm aware that damage can be done to the rear end by hitting the ends of the axle with a hammer.  I just hope that the brake drum's outward "yank" from the slide hammer --which is, in turn, exerted on the axle -- doesn't do similar damage to the axle bearing or the rearend gears. 

Comments

  • bob wardbob ward Posts: 1,336Senior Contributor
    A slide hammer would not be my tool of choice to remove a Hudson rear hub
    Lockyer Valley, Queensland
  • Jon BJon B Posts: 7,420Administrator
    Well, I'll withdraw the question, because my neighbor's "old faithful" whack-a-dogbone puller, worked like a charm.  There was a sudden "bang" and off came the brake drum.
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,462Senior Contributor
    A slide hammer should do the job if it is securely  bolted to the drum.  This would apply the force to the drum only, whereas if you are  using a hammer on the end of the axle you are applying the shock to the thrust buttons.   
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • Jon BJon B Posts: 7,420Administrator
    Thanks for your always-appreciated thoughts, Geoff.  But just for argument's sake: when you slide that hammer, doesn't it  pull the axle outwards, applying pressure to the outer bearing (which is prevented from moving by the bearing retainer)?  I'm always curious about things like this.
  • bob wardbob ward Posts: 1,336Senior Contributor
    edited June 19
    You're right Jon, that's how it would work with a slide hammer, to me you are putting a lot of faith in the strength and non-distortability of the bearing retainer. The traditional puller applies the forces exactly where needed, ie to the drum and the end of the axle.
    Lockyer Valley, Queensland
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,462Senior Contributor
    You are theoretically correct Jon, but in practice I have never known  a bearing or retainer to break. In any case, both are replaceable.  And an important thing to remember is  when using a conventional puller, always have the nut at the end of the axle threads, as you can easily distort the threads.  I have about 20 axles here that haver all been removed by the heavy hammer method, and all the threads are shot.  
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • Jon BJon B Posts: 7,420Administrator
    I followed that advice this afternoon when using a conventional "dogbone" puller, whacking it unmercifully with a hammer.   The threads are intact!
  • Uncle JoshUncle Josh Posts: 2,685Senior Contributor
    I have found that if you support the axle, you get a more solid whack on the dog bone.  I have canned the dog bone and used my air wrench on the last few.  The vibration seems to loosen the locking taper better than the whacking.
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