Routine 70 year maintenance, 1929 Essex

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  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member


    Realizing I should have paced myself yesterday, I was content to do nothing but recuperate with a victory lap, fetch the mail and rinse the cleanser off the headlight buckets. That driver’s side headlamp has been bugging me for some time now. It will be dealt with soon. 
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    Today I finished up with the chassis lubrication. 
    My endorsement of the zerksplusdotcom bayonet Alemite fitting lubricating fitting is hereby rescinded!

     The inner bore is too small to fit the Alemite fittings! 
    I will bore it out to fit but for what they cost that is unconscionable! 

    The bayonet fitting accidentally unthreaded from the antique grease gun so I threaded it onto my modern grease gun and all the remaining zerks took grease well!

    Given the filthy nature of chassis lubrication I took no photographs of the fun.

    As it turns out, making the headlight bucket adjustment was more involved than I thought. I had to also adjust the headlight bar brackets where they attach to the front fenders. They look nice snd straight now. 

    I am beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel and will begin the washing, waxing and other appearance issues soon!
  • MariusMarius Posts: 110Member
    my 28 essex super six has a rear dif. seal leak.. i just add gear oil , but the mrs said to fix it BUT i'm not sure about the seal,,, is it some prehistoric leather seal??
    i also acquired a barn find 27

  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,523Senior Contributor
    Depends where the leak is - wheel,  or pinion.  Original seals are felt washers.  Can be replaced with modern seals with a bit of jiggery-pokery.  or the felts can be  shrunk down for extra service by removing and wrapping with a thin strip of gasket paper around the periphery and re-used.  Do you want an original flying man radiator cap for your '28? 
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    edited September 2020
    Thanks for the suggestion! What about the possibility of cutting out some new felt and replacing it entirely? The hood ornament sounds nice. If Marius isn’t interested and it is appropriate for a 1929 I would like to acquire one. 

    I’m sure that you will have the 1927 looking great in no time! Do I detect a hint of metallic in the 1928?
  • MariusMarius Posts: 110Member
    the hood ornament came off a trophy that the gentleman i bought the car off , he was in the rod and gun club, he told me some PUNK stole it from him breaking it in the process, then a few weeks later posted it in a buy and sell , the old timer went to see it and saw that it was his but DID NOT give the kid $100. i would have showed him a size 10 workboot.... but you cant touch kids now a days..
    so for the sake of respect i will keep it as is... the man spent 20 years and over 30,000$
    and yes its glitter, all his life he did body work,NO BONDO he used sheets of LEAD...  took it south in the OKANAGAN to his buddy that is a upholstery expert ...
    the barn find will remain as is in storage, by the way when he rebuilt the 28 he saw welds on the frame and found a perfect frame,
    i will rebuild the motor for the 28 and put it back in
    right now there is a 1972 toyota motor and trans. in it
    top speed is 38 mph

  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    Metalflake will last a long time as I’m sure you keep that beauty in a garage!  
    Beating juvenile delinquents is just FINE. Just don’t leave bruises or let them turn on their camera phones for evidence!
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    My brother came out this morning to help Me set new gate posts. He brought out “Violet” The ‘56 F100 truck/ 1994 CrownVictoria sedan body swap our Dad built and named after our grandmother. It just got a brand new Vintage Air system in it so now he will drive it year round since it’s no longer a motorized oven!

     We hit Caliche/Clay at 2-1/2 feet down and only managed to get one done. Dad’s old 1942 2-N really earned it’s keep today!






  • GlowplugGlowplug Posts: 2,337Expert Adviser
    KD... Great post... really like to VINTAGE IRON in use pictures... Have a great weekend ....GLOWPLUG

  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    edited September 2020
    At the risk of being off topic I included the Essex. My brother hadn’t heard my snazzy brand new capsule muffler yet. He was impressed that the resonance still had that tough sounding Hudson rumble. I love that it’s a little quieter inside and you can hear those lovely straight cut gears singing!
    You have a good one as well!

    This might actually be a usable link to my security camera if all goes well. The exhaust sounds great in the video. 


     When I cut up some firewood, I’ll get some photographs of “Lips” and the “widow-maker”. We have another cold front on Monday and I’m looking forward to firing up the wood stoves!


    This is one of the gate posts. Next time my brother is bringing the digging bar and my great grandfather’s post hole digger because I broke the one I inherited from a great uncle. 

  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,523Senior Contributor
    Here are some f the castings I can  get done or '28-'29 Essex and Hudson.  Flying man cap in centre.
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    Geoff said:
    Here are some f the castings I can  get done or '28-'29 Essex and Hudson.  Flying man cap in centre.
    That’s very elegant, and would make a nice alternative to the original. 
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    Glowplug said:
    KD... Great post... really like to VINTAGE IRON in use pictures... Have a great weekend ....GLOWPLUG

    Here’s the widow-maker in action as promised, making short work of cordwood cutting! The cold front blowing in right now provides an excellent incentive to git er dunn  

    Here she is in traveling position, ready to drop into action and tear through the next limb! I spend a lot less time sharpening the 29” blade than I would on a chainsaw. 

  • GlowplugGlowplug Posts: 2,337Expert Adviser
    Thanks for the pictures KD

  • ESSX28-1ESSX28-1 Posts: 1,394Senior Contributor
    Another vintage machinery concept
    Dave Y New Zealand
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    Nice Luxury sickle mower! I wish you could see the PTO in the photograph. 

     I have a few Dearborn sickle mowers pasteurizing out back that I will get to one day....
  • ski4life65ski4life65 Posts: 1,155Expert Adviser
    Pretty sure neither one of those would be OSHA approved. :D
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    The next maintenance item is acquiring a horn button contact to pass a state inspection, green card and Texas registration. Then I can hit the farm roads and warm up the driveline for fluid changes. 

    I also need to solve the mystery of how to replace the dome light bulb. It would be criminal to damage the bezel since it is very firmly in place. 
  • 5433HET5433HET Posts: 106Expert Adviser
    The next maintenance item is acquiring a horn button contact to pass a state inspection, green card and Texas registration. Then I can hit the farm roads and warm up the driveline for fluid changes. 

    I also need to solve the mystery of how to replace the dome light bulb. It would be criminal to damage the bezel since it is very firmly in place. 
    Isn't the dome lens held with a spring steel ring that surrounds the glass and creates pressure holding it?
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    edited September 2020
    Pretty sure neither one of those would be OSHA approved. :D
    Ralph Nader would be apoplectic!


     I have this unhealthy obsession with dangerous machinery....

    If anyone thinks Mechanical brakes were primitive,
     

    this 52”, 1877 Coventry Machinists co Gentleman’s roadster has a string actuated brake! This example still bears the original tires, so I opted to never ride it  in order to preserve it’s originality. I have serviced all the bearings as is it would be ridden, just to clean out all the old hardened grease. The bearings are inserts similar to the lower rod bearing halves of a moder engine.

    This one is in on loan to the Texas Transportation Museum so Im safe from it! 


    I have a reproduction 48” highwheel because I’m also accident prone and don’t want to wreck the original ones!
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    5433HET said:
    The next maintenance item is acquiring a horn button contact to pass a state inspection, green card and Texas registration. Then I can hit the farm roads and warm up the driveline for fluid changes. 

    I also need to solve the mystery of how to replace the dome light bulb. It would be criminal to damage the bezel since it is very firmly in place. 
    Isn't the dome lens held with a spring steel ring that surrounds the glass and creates pressure holding it?
    That’s the thing. 
    I’ve tried gently pushing and twisting but there’s just no “give” in any direction. 
    So I walk away before I do anything stupid or irreparable!

  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,523Senior Contributor
    The bezel is held into the fixture like a light bulb.  Best method I have found is ot get a small lblunt screwdriver against the edge of the rim and gently tap with a small hammer clockwise and then  lever the bezel down.
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    I will proceed with a tiny blunt screwdriver and extreme caution!
     I received your email about the hood ornament and gather you are going to hold off and send it and the technical topics at the same time for efficiency.
  • RocketRocket Posts: 504Senior Contributor
    Geoff I sent you a pm about getting your technical topics did you get it thanks Tom Lynch.
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 4,523Senior Contributor
    Yes Tom, but the email reply bounced back.  If you email me your postal address I'll put you on the list and send a group email ,and a posting here on the forum, when the books are ready to post.
    Geoff 
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • 40indianssgmailcom40indianssgmailcom Posts: 272Senior Contributor
    The truck is interesting.  It must be for hauling cordwood
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    It’s got a 454 Chevrolet shoehorned in there. 
    It gets 9 MPG carrying cordwood or pulling a house it makes no difference. 
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    Today I got the nerve to smack the dome light around with the rawhide mallet. Thanks to Geoff for explaining the trick to it!  Unfortunately the bulb was good so I cleaned up the bezel and lens. 

    The toggle switch was all lucy goosey inside because the plunger had broken in two and the brass tabs had all broken off so the connection lugs had turned loose but they were still firmly connected to the ends of the wires. It was firmly adhered to the upholstery so I had to use my thumbnail to push the upholstery all around the perimeter of the switch plate. 

    When I shorted the two leads there was no light but eventually the switch would need attention so I prised the two rusty tabs apart and found a broken dirty mess. 


     Rather than try to solder the tiny brittle tabs back on I soldered four strands of copper wire around the contact, sandwiching the phenolic between it and both connection lugs. Unfortunately, tightening up the wire broke the phenolic plate so I had to cut one out of masonite. 




    Rather than fold down the steel tabs again I drilled eye holes in them and inserted a stainless wire retainer because eventually the tabs break if you have to disassemble the switch again. 

    While removing the more temperamental screw from the lug the leads touched and the dome light shined! They were working after all!



    I don’t know what the plunger was made of but it must have been celluloid or bakelite so I took a bamboo kitchen spoon and carved one out of the bamboo, trimming it incrementally for not too much tension. 
     
    The retaining wire that sandwiches the contact together kept shorting out against the switch body to an always on default so I put a slice of electrical tape on the inner wall of the housing and then the switch began working properly!



    It’s all installed now and working “correctly“ 

  • 25truck25truck Posts: 48Member
    Nice job !!
    I like your 1935 Liberty for scale 

    it is very satisfying to fix all the little parts and bring these nearly 100 year old cars back to life 
  • rusty_apacherusty_apache Posts: 214Member
    edited October 2020
    Thanks, I’ll bet your truck was a real hit at the show!

    Even the 60 year olds are satisfying to work on.

    That’s actually a Mercury dime and this Comet is not a Mercury, 
    They didn’t adopt the baby Edsel until 1962.

    Not a microchip or metric fastener in sight!


    This is going to be the daily driver eventually. 
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