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WingerWinger Posts: 6Member
I just bought a 40 coupe all original survivor with the “businessman’s bed”. First Hudson owned. Looking forward to this one.  I will be full of questions. Thanks in advance  

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  • Jon BJon B Posts: 7,078Administrator
    Welcome, Winger!  Looks like a beauty.  Ask your questions....we're full of answers!

    (By the way, why not let us know your general location?  There may be some Hudson enthusiasts living in your area.  Handy, in case you need some help!)
  • WingerWinger Posts: 6Member
    I live in the Portland Oregon area. I will be contacting the regional chapter this week. 
    I had all these visions of rodding it but I’m changing my tune since it’s a survivor. Not sure what I want to do now. Dual exhaust, wheels/tires, maybe pull this motor and save it, put in a later one?  Any input will be appreciated. Questions I have:
    o need to add seatbelts. Any recommendations?
    i would like to add seats but I would need to pull or modify the box. Anybody added seats to a coupe?
  • WingerWinger Posts: 6Member
    It lived in a museum for awhile on the Oregon coast. Bob Harbaugh Hudson Museum. I tried looking it up but found nothing. Anybody heard of it?
  • Jon BJon B Posts: 7,078Administrator
    As to modifications, you're going to do what you want to do.  But just keep in mind that many of us are still driving these cars around -- on long trips, even -- with the original drive trains.  I, for example, have a 1937 I've driven on several 1500-2000 mile trips with no problems.  I did install an overdrive transmission several years ago -- my concession to "modifications" -- because it lets me cruise at 60 mph all day.  Your engine may, however, be the somewhat anemic, 83-horsepower one used in the commercial models.  If so you can always substitute the 101 hp. 3x5, it fits right into the engine compartment.  Of course there is any number of more modern engines than can be transplanted, including the Hudson Jet 202 cid engine from the early 1950's, a completely modern engine with 104 hp.

    You asked about seatbelts; I think most Hudson owners have added those, for safety purposes.  Several companies offer aftermarket ones in a range of colors.

    Sideward facing seats were used in some Hudson coupes of the late 1930's / early 1940's.  But you're right: the slide out pickup bed would have to go because it takes up the room that the seats would require.
  • WingerWinger Posts: 6Member
    Jon B said:
    As to modifications, you're going to do what you want to do.  But just keep in mind that many of us are still driving these cars around -- on long trips, even -- with the original drive trains.  I, for example, have a 1937 I've driven on several 1500-2000 mile trips with no problems.  I did install an overdrive transmission several years ago -- my concession to "modifications" -- because it lets me cruise at 60 mph all day.  Your engine may, however, be the somewhat anemic, 83-horsepower one used in the commercial models.  If so you can always substitute the 101 hp. 3x5, it fits right into the engine compartment.  Of course there is any number of more modern engines than can be transplanted, including the Hudson Jet 202 cid engine from the early 1950's, a completely modern engine with 104 hp.

    You asked about seatbelts; I think most Hudson owners have added those, for safety purposes.  Several companies offer aftermarket ones in a range of colors.

    Sideward facing seats were used in some Hudson coupes of the late 1930's / early 1940's.  But you're right: the slide out pickup bed would have to go because it takes up the room that the seats would require.
    Mine has the overdrive option as well. I believe it has the 92hp 175 ci. I was thinking the 202 or 308 if that bolts up. I need to put a few miles on it to get a feel for it. Might not want to do anything to it. The motor was rebuilt in the 90s. Not sure how many miles have been put on it since. Probably not much. 
  • GlowplugGlowplug Posts: 2,020Expert Adviser
    Nice cars are coming to the forefront all over... thanks for sharing. Try to get your car into safe operating tick and drive it before making decisions on modifications.  Again .. thanks for sharing.
  • WingerWinger Posts: 6Member
    Glowplug said:
    Nice cars are coming to the forefront all over... thanks for sharing. Try to get your car into safe operating tick and drive it before making decisions on modifications.  Again .. thanks for sharing.
    Agreed. Thanks for input. 
  • 1954Hudson1954Hudson Posts: 155Member
    edited May 10
    Hi Leave the 40 as is,rare Car, I have 3 1940 Hudsons  Ron



  • JasonNCJasonNC Posts: 919Expert Adviser
    Did salesmen actually sleep in that box back in the day?
  • 35 Terraplane35 Terraplane Posts: 287Senior Contributor
    I believe the box held the salesmen's merchandise / samples 
  • JasonNCJasonNC Posts: 919Expert Adviser
    I believe the box held the salesmen's merchandise / samples 
    That's what I thought.  It confused me when he called it the "businessman's bed" in his introduction.  
  • WingerWinger Posts: 6Member
    Hi Leave the 40 as is,rare Car, I have 3 1940 Hudsons  Ron



    Yep. I’m not going to do anything I can’t undo. Tires, exhaust. Even if I do decide to swap motors  I’ll keep this one for sure to throw back in. 
  • Club CoupeClub Coupe Posts: 208Expert Adviser
    Julianos.com is who I used for seat/shoulder belts.
  • KdancyKdancy Posts: 2,483Senior Contributor
    In all the years I have been restoring vehicles, I have never seen one "updated" qand later changed back to stock.
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 3,939Senior Contributor
    The motto of the club used to  be "Dedicated to preserving the great cars built by Hudson".   Nowadays, it's "Anything goes".
  • Jon BJon B Posts: 7,078Administrator
    Incidentally, you can see interior photos (though not very clear) of the interior of both the business coupe (which has a large "box" in the back seat area, to hide the slide-out pickup bed), and the 4-passenger coupe which has a fixed, sideward facing back seat on the driver's side, and a fold-up sideways seat on the driver's side.  This is in the "body" section of the 1940 group parts book, which is available as a download (to Club members) on the H-E-T website.
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