Introduction - Chuck Sherman

Hi!  

I've been a member of the old car hobby since 1973, and have had a number of old cars from the 20's through the 80's.  I know some of you don't think an 80's car is that old, buuut...keeping an American Motors Eagle on the road in 2019 is every bit as challenging as keeping a Hudson roadworthy was in the 80's.  
I have just sold my 1928 AV8 track roadster to a land speed record racer, and he mentioned he had a friend with a Hudson. For what it's worth, I'm named after my grandfather, John Charles Sherman, who worked at the Connor Street plant from 1928-1954.  I have his Twenty Year Pin and one of the 1951 diecast stepdown models to this day.  

As part of the deal, the new owner of the above car is delivering a 1951 Pacemaker which is a Northern California car (I live in Sonora, CA) and he will be delivering the car next weekend as he picks up this one.  

I've been a member of the HET before, and knew Jack Miller well, and spent time with Bill Albright.  I've looked at literally dozens of Hudsons over the years, and either the timing was wrong, the car was too far gone, or I didn't have enough money.  I was going to buy Squirrel's 1951 Hornet after the hotrod sold.  The Pacemaker just fell in my lap, and there's a guy nearby with a complete running '53 Hornet driveline, including the alloy head, that is available.  I actually prefer the looks of the stubby-nosed Pacemaker with its lower trim level - and it has the added benefit of fitting more easily into the garage/shop while being lighter than the long wheelbase cars.  The lack of trim and short nose accentuate the cabin, which is still one of the prettiest things on the road, as far as I'm concerned.  

The car is admittedly in rough condition, but I have a pretty specific idea as to what I'd like to end up with.  When I get them, I'll post up some pix to document the starting condition.  I need to rejoin the HET as well.  

After a nearly 30 year wait - I'll finally have a Hudson!  I look forward to asking all the silly newbie questions as I begin the restoration! 

Comments

  • lostmindlostmind Posts: 1,230Expert Adviser
    welcome
    Photos please
  • When I get them, I'll post up some pix.  

  • Jon BJon B Posts: 6,928Administrator
    Welcome back to the goodly fellowship of Hudson enthusiasts!  You certainly have the right background....and a noble lineage!
  • ValVal Posts: 780Member
    Welcome Chuck, Look forward to seeing the pictures1!
  • Jon B said:
    Welcome back to the goodly fellowship of Hudson enthusiasts!  You certainly have the right background....and a noble lineage!
    Thank you!  Third gen automotive guy; born and raised in Detroit.  Dad's first car was a '36 Terraplane; Grandpa died before I was born, but had a '47 Hudson.  They lived north of 12 Mile on Utica Rd. in Roseville, MI. I grew up in the area and was exposed to Hudsons as a kid. Pop almost bought a Wasp before he bought the Model A, which appealed more to Mom.   

    The Pacemaker will have to be a "special" build.  I want my wife to be able to drive it, which means I have to install power steering and power brakes. She has a disorder which leaves her weak and unable to operate cars with manual steering, manual brakes and manual transmissions - although she could when she was younger.  Adapting power brakes to the "Triple Safe" system looks fairly straightforward; I see no reason not to keep the drums all the way around.  My Dad drove his Model A up and down Pikes Peak with no issue.  It's a function of how one drives drum brakes that's important.  I do it all day long in a log hauler I built and have no issues.  

    Adapting power steering to "True Center Point" steering is a bit more interesting.  It would be nice if a Saginaw P/S box was adaptable, but I may have to go the Studebaker route and add a servo assist cylinder.  I don't know - has anyone else done it? I want to retain the original geometry, as I think it really neat and advanced; besides - it works.

    As much as I like a manual trans, I'll be adapting a GM 4 speed O/D auto to get a good combination of off-line performance and "modern" highway RPM out of the engine.  My wife can't push in a clutch, period.  So, I'll sort out the final drive and trans gear ratios so 75 MPH is around 2500-2800 RPM with whatever tire I end up with.  I like a nice wide WWW, and think a Hudson looks right with them. My Chryslers did - I had a '55 and a '56.  There's more, but the post would get long-ish.    Thanks again! 
  • GlowplugGlowplug Posts: 1,757Expert Adviser
    Use my website to find answers and vendors.  Electric PS and power brakes along with GM auto overdrives have been added to Hudsons. Some of these topics are detailed on the site...
    https://hudsonrestoration1948-54.com/
  • 50C8DAN50C8DAN Posts: 1,794Senior Contributor
    edited September 2
    Electric Power steering is the way to go with so few other options available for Hudsons.  You could use a hydrovac system for power brakes like Studebaker and others (like Chev, Ford, and even Mercedes).  It is pretty straight forward, just need a good location to mount the unit.  Studebaker International even sells new units.

    Here is a video on EPS on a '49 Hudson.


  • BigSkyBigSky Posts: 363Senior Contributor
    Welcome & congrats on your upcoming project.  However, I just love that Track Roadster you’ve sold, very cool!!!
  • Glowplug said:
    Use my website to find answers and vendors.  Electric PS and power brakes along with GM auto overdrives have been added to Hudsons. Some of these topics are detailed on the site...
    https://hudsonrestoration1948-54.com/

    I love your site!  I was on it a few weeks ago as I rekindled the desire for a Hudson.  Thanks! 


  • 50C8DAN said:
    Electric Power steering is the way to go with so few other options available for Hudsons.  You could use a hydrovac system for power brakes like Studebaker and others (like Chev, Ford, and even Mercedes).  It is pretty straight forward, just need a good location to mount the unit.  Studebaker International even sells new units.
    Thanks!  I'm familiar with hydroboost.  Using EPS is new to me.  My thoughts revolved around a servo cylinder application, much like what Studebaker used for PS - and is used for retrofit of power steering on older trucks, like the '59 Ford I had.  I don't like modern  stuff on something over 50 years old; the effect is jarring to a restorer.  I still use points in cars which came with them new, for example.  The exceptions will be for sound deadening and insulation, along with a transparent low-e film on the inside of the glass to reduce solar gain.  The tinny clang of a Hudson door closing has bugged me; I'd like to to mimic the Mercedes I had a few years back. 

    To be honest, I'm going to attempt to build the car in a period-correct way.  I want it to have a measure of authenticity both inside and out while creating a level of driver and passenger comfort which satisfies my wife.  She tolerates most of my cars; the only recent exception being a Bentley.  If I can approach the comfort of that car (and I think I can) then I will have succeeded.  

  • BigSky said:
    Welcome & congrats on your upcoming project.  However, I just love that Track Roadster you’ve sold, very cool!!!

    Thanks!  It's an example of a period correct build.  Nothing on the car after 1949, save for a 12 volt cooling fan ahead of the radiator. The car uses a step-up inverter to power the fan.  I don't like it - but it was needed to run in stop and go traffic.  The rest of the system is six volt.  

  • 40indianssgmailcom40indianssgmailcom Posts: 103Senior Contributor
    To minimize the 'tinny' sound of a door closing as I did on my mgb v8 I used peel and stick roofing sealer available at any big box hardware store.  It is essentially dynamat at a much lower price, like $16 for 25 square feet.  It is a roll 6 inches wide and 50 feet long.  Works great
  • To minimize the 'tinny' sound of a door closing as I did on my mgb v8 I used peel and stick roofing sealer available at any big box hardware store.  It is essentially dynamat at a much lower price, like $16 for 25 square feet.  It is a roll 6 inches wide and 50 feet long.  Works great
    That's AWESOME!  I'd planned on gluing in the double-sided reflective insulation available at big box stores as well.  The garage/shop doors face south and the place heated up during the day.  I added it to the garage door, and the inside temps dropped a good five degrees!  It's inexpensive - about $15 a roll, as I recall.  This would be a nice combo!  
  • 50C8DAN50C8DAN Posts: 1,794Senior Contributor
    Chuck hydrovac and hydroboost are two different things.  

    Hydrovac: http://dave78chieftain.com/HydroVac_brakes.html

    https://www.reference.com/vehicles/hydro-boost-brakes-work-bcdefcd6cbbcf9d2

    Hydroboost uses the powersteering pump to apply the pressure.

  • 50C8DAN50C8DAN Posts: 1,794Senior Contributor
    Also, power steering was available on both long and short wheelbase Hudsons in 1954, but they are different and do not interchange.  Both are pretty hard to find and my guess is the shorter wheelbase ones are even more rare.
  • 50C8DAN said:
    Chuck hydrovac and hydroboost are two different things.  

    Hydrovac: http://dave78chieftain.com/HydroVac_brakes.html

    https://www.reference.com/vehicles/hydro-boost-brakes-work-bcdefcd6cbbcf9d2

    Hydroboost uses the powersteering pump to apply the pressure.

    Fascinating!  I had no idea!  A remote mounted vacuum servo!  I learned something today, thanks! 

  • squirrelsquirrel Posts: 168Member
    power brakes as installed originally on a 55 Tbird.


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