Hub puller for brake drum removal

keithfullmeryahoocomkeithfullmeryahoocom Expert Adviser
in HUDSON Posts: 293
Anybody know a source for the required puller for removing the rear brake drums on a '50 Commodore?   Rent, borrow, buy?  These guys are STUCK!

Comments

  • Jon BJon B Administrator
    Posts: 6,671
    You might call a tool rental company, especially one that's been around awhile.  They might have one.  Otherwise, it might not be a bad idea to invest in one, since you may need it again.  This drum will give you just as much trouble the second time around.
    On Ebay I see a couple used ones whose bids are now in the $30's, and there are new ones ranging from $60 up to the $90's.
  • keithfullmeryahoocomkeithfullmeryahoocom Expert Adviser
    Posts: 293
    Thanks Jon.  Don't know why I didn't think of that.  Lots of them on there.  I opted for an old Snap on over the ones that just had a "sketch" instead of a real picture.  Looks like it has been around the horn a few times, probably yanked several drums.  keith
  • Ken U-TxKen U-Tx Senior Contributor
    Posts: 3,435
    Yes, nice to have a drum puller in your inventory of tools if you are a committed long term Hudsonite. Can even buy them new . They are still being made. Mine was from K-D Tools. I prefer the one with a removable dog-bone, and instead of whaling on the dogbone with a sledgehammer, I put a 1-1/8" impact socket on the threaded center bolt hex and use a good impact wrench with an air compressor. even a portable air compressor of 5-6 gallons will work as you only use the impact wrench in short bursts.
  • keithfullmeryahoocomkeithfullmeryahoocom Expert Adviser
    edited April 6 Posts: 293
    Ken, do you still sell the original brake parts?  (I am anticipating that I will finally succeed in the rear brake drum removal.)  Lol.


  • HansHans Senior Contributor
    Posts: 36
  • bluenashbluenash Member
    Posts: 34
    Where are you located? If you are kinda close to me I have one you could borrow. (44833)
  • keithfullmeryahoocomkeithfullmeryahoocom Expert Adviser
    Posts: 293
    Thanks, bluenash, for the generous offer.   I went ahead and bought one that I saw on ebay.   Drums are still there and waiting for it to show up...k
  • syddthekiddsyddthekidd Expert Adviser
    Posts: 220
    Here is my solution to that problem but you have to be willing to sacrifice the locating pin for the wheel.  Once you have the drum/hub off.  One rivet at a time, grind the head off the rivet and drive it out.  The hole in the hub is the perfect size to tap either 3/8-16 or 5/16-18...can't remember which.  Then c'sink the drum but not too deep and install a flat head socket cap screw.  You only need to do this with 3 of the rivets in a triangular pattern and then you will have a removeable drum and you can then retire the puller and you won't keep wrecking the threads on the ends of your axles.  I did this to the fronts as well so I didn't have to fool with the bearings to get to the brakes.  I know someone is going to scream "NOW YOUR DRUM ISN'T CENTERED"......which is why you do the rivets one at a time.  Works like a charm. 
  • bob wardbob ward Senior Contributor
    Posts: 1,016
    The structure of the 2 piece design of the Hudson (and others) brake drum needs those 5 rivets to give the drum rigidity, they were put there to do more than just keep the brake components together while the car went down the assembly line.
    Car makers and component suppliers have always been looking for ways to shave a few cents off their costs. If the brake designers/engineers of the day thought it was OK to punch just 3 rivet holes in the hub and drum rather than 5 and install just 3 rivets (2 standard rivets and 1 peg rivet) that's what would have happened.
    Then downgrading the downgrade that never happened from hot rivets to countersunk screws?
    I'll stick to 5 rivets and using to a drum puller every now and then.
    Lockyer Valley, Queensland
  • syddthekiddsyddthekidd Expert Adviser
    Posts: 220
    Also forgot to mention I then press studs in from the rear of the hubs.  I think the fact that the studs being pressed from the rear of the hub and then the drum being sandwiched between the wheel and hub would provide plenty of rigidity.  I don't design brakes but do design custom thermoforming equipment.  My '81 CJ-7 rear diff. has very similar brake design and set up as my Hudsons and the drum simply slides on over the studs and is tightened up with the wheel nuts (as are all modern cars).  Doing up the brakes on the rear of the CJ is what gave me the idea.  If the designers of the 50's had everything right we'd still be driving cars with flatheads.  Also I've made a 1/2" plate that slides over my new studs with places for my puller to attach to for the eventuality when I do need to pull the rear hub.
  • RG53HornetRG53Hornet Senior Contributor
    Posts: 51
      I know someone is going to scream "NOW YOUR DRUM ISN'T CENTERED"......which is why you do the rivets one at a time.  Works like a charm. 

    So what would one do if a previous owner drilled out all the rivets (and left them out) to do the brake work? I have not yet driven the car so I do not how the brakes will feel driving but I have a nice pedal feel sitting still. As a side note the P/O worked at a tire and brake shop and put in all new shoes, turned the drums,  new rubber hoses, wheel and master cyl.






  • 50C8DAN50C8DAN Senior Contributor
    Posts: 1,690
    I have an extra one of these if anyone is interested in adding it to your tool collection.
  • syddthekiddsyddthekidd Expert Adviser
    Posts: 220
    RG53Hornet.  I think if I ever ran into this (which I don't think will ever happen) I'd install wheel studs as I have done and I wouldn't worry about it.  There is a small boss on the hub to center the drum and once you pull the wheel nuts up tight you have the same exact assembly as almost every other automobile running around with rear drum brakes.  The wheel cylinder will push the brakes out until they contact the drum....the drum is the stop....it'll get there.  I assume you've seen this situation.  If so, someone must not have had a hub puller or didn't know any other way to get to the brakes.  If you install wheel studs from the back side of the hub you no longer need the locating pin anyway....you have 5 locating pins.
  • cchancelcchancel Member
    Posts: 30
    50C8DAN

    Please PM me. How much for the hub puller?

    Thank you.
  • RG53HornetRG53Hornet Senior Contributor
    Posts: 51
    RG53Hornet.  I think if I ever ran into this (which I don't think will ever happen) I'd install wheel studs as I have done and I wouldn't worry about it.  There is a small boss on the hub to center the drum and once you pull the wheel nuts up tight you have the same exact assembly as almost every other automobile running around with rear drum brakes.  The wheel cylinder will push the brakes out until they contact the drum....the drum is the stop....it'll get there.  I assume you've seen this situation.  If so, someone must not have had a hub puller or didn't know any other way to get to the brakes.  If you install wheel studs from the back side of the hub you no longer need the locating pin anyway....you have 5 locating pins.
    Thanks syddthekid. How did you use the press in studs? Did you drill out the hub to remove the threads or is there a wheel stud that threads in from the back?
    Robert
  • syddthekiddsyddthekidd Expert Adviser
    Posts: 220
    RG53Hornet.  At the risk of drawing more flack from the it'll never work crowd I actually used 7/16 studs and the knurling bit right into the 1/2" threads in the hub.  I've made two trips to California and back from Ohio in my truck and the wheels didn't fly off.  The second trip was in the 70mph range as my truck has a 262 and I installed a dana diff with 3.54 gears before driving to San Diego last year.  You can't beat this set up for brake access and it saves the threads on the end of the axle.  I'm sure in my lifetime I'll never have the hubs off again.  When I installed the diff the gears, bearing, seals, etc were all new so I'm set for life.....and when I want to change the brakes, no problem.  Be careful when buying the studs, the do come with different knurl sizes.  If you have the hub off take it to a local parts store or take a set of calipers and measure the inside threaded portion and get on summit racing and look for studs.  They usually list the knurl diameter.  Get it a bit bigger than the inside dia. on the threads so it can get a bite. 
  • RG53HornetRG53Hornet Senior Contributor
    Posts: 51
    RG53Hornet.  At the risk of drawing more flack from the it'll never work crowd I actually used 7/16 studs and the knurling bit right into the 1/2" threads in the hub.  I've made two trips to California and back from Ohio in my truck and the wheels didn't fly off.  The second trip was in the 70mph range as my truck has a 262 and I installed a dana diff with 3.54 gears before driving to San Diego last year.  You can't beat this set up for brake access and it saves the threads on the end of the axle.  I'm sure in my lifetime I'll never have the hubs off again.  When I installed the diff the gears, bearing, seals, etc were all new so I'm set for life.....and when I want to change the brakes, no problem.  Be careful when buying the studs, the do come with different knurl sizes.  If you have the hub off take it to a local parts store or take a set of calipers and measure the inside threaded portion and get on summit racing and look for studs.  They usually list the knurl diameter.  Get it a bit bigger than the inside dia. on the threads so it can get a bite. 
    Good info, thank you very much!
Sign In or Register to comment.