Engine versus Motor

FrankvintagefullflowcomFrankvintagefullflowcom Posts: 929Senior Contributor
edited April 2016 in OFF TOPIC

A post entitled "Anyone need an H8 Engine", regarding the availability of a couple of Hudson Eights has morphed into some discussion about the terms "engine" and "motor". It will be fun to see where this one goes and, feeling that I should spread the joy, I thought I'd move it over here.

Let the games begin.

Frank

Comments

  • RL ChiltonRL Chilton Posts: 5,131Administrator, Moderator
    This is pretty much everything one needs to know on the subject:

  • 53jetman53jetman Posts: 1,225Senior Contributor
    Russ:  That explanation is "Deep"
  • GlowplugGlowplug Posts: 1,750Expert Adviser
    HUDSON MOTOR CAR COMPANY
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 3,609Senior Contributor
    Perhaps we should cast the net wider - what about "Dimmer switch"???  Which cars have lights that actually dim?   Or lug bolts?   What lugs are they meant for?
  • FrankvintagefullflowcomFrankvintagefullflowcom Posts: 929Senior Contributor
    I believe the lug bolt is the male of the species whereas the nut is the female.
  • parkermparkerm Posts: 188Expert Adviser
    Back in my middle school days (many many years ago) one my shop teachers said the definition was "Electric Motors and Gas Engines."
  • RL ChiltonRL Chilton Posts: 5,131Administrator, Moderator
    parkerm said:
    Back in my middle school days (many many years ago) one my shop teachers said the definition was "Electric Motors and Gas Engines."
    I believe that's how it started.  
  • Nevada HudsonNevada Hudson Posts: 1,247Senior Contributor
    Really don't care what they call it. They can call it a motor or an engine, as I still know what they mean. 
  • FrankvintagefullflowcomFrankvintagefullflowcom Posts: 929Senior Contributor

    I case anyone gives a rip, here's how I have always understood the engine/motor thing to be:

    An engine is a device, be it an I/C engine, a steam engine, or any other machine that uses energy generated from within itself, to convert that energy into motion. Gasoline, Diesel, Propane, LNG, firewood, etc. aren't energy. They are chemicals used as fuel to combine with other chemicals (usually O2, of course) in the engine. The resultant energy is converted into motion by a variety of mechanical means.

    A motor uses energy from an outside source......such as electricity from batteries, a generator or public power, and converts it into motion. A boiler fired by one of the above fuels in conjunction with a steam motor becomes a steam engine meeting the criterion of having the energy created within the complete device. The part that converts the energy to motion (a reciprocating piston motor, steam turbine, etc.) is just the motor, using energy from another source, that being the boiler.

    A RR steam locomotive, for instance, has steam motors to drive the wheels, but the whole monstrous device is a steam engine since it also produces the source of energy within itself.

    That's' my two bits worth.

    F   

  • hudsn47hudsn47 Posts: 166Senior Contributor

    This is very interesting to me. Appreciate the explanation. Doug

  • 50C8DAN50C8DAN Posts: 1,790Senior Contributor
    Frank nice complete explanation.  That is what I remember as well.  When I was in Ag class and we rebuilt small engines our teacher would go ballistic if someone called a Briggs and Stratton a motor.
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 3,609Senior Contributor
    How about "Hudson Engine Car Co"?image
  • FrankvintagefullflowcomFrankvintagefullflowcom Posts: 929Senior Contributor

    I knew that was coming. I have an even-more-abstract explanation for that one as well but I don't have time to write a book on the subject and I'd still get resistance anyway.

    The short version:   In the very early days of "motorcars", they were basically horse-drawn buggies ("cars") modified by mounting an engine/drive system. The engine was thought of as a source of propulsion that was not how the buggy was originally powered and, thus, was an "outside" source of power. Of course, it soon became a common combination so the term "motorcar" kinda, sorta, pretty much still applies. I guess this would make the horse an "engine" by daffynition.

    F

    F

  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 3,609Senior Contributor

    I knew that was coming. I have an even-more-abstract explanation for that one as well but I don't have time to write a book on the subject and I'd still get resistance anyway.

    The short version:   In the very early days of "motorcars", they were basically horse-drawn buggies ("cars") modified by mounting an engine/drive system. The engine was thought of as a source of propulsion that was not how the buggy was originally powered and, thus, was an "outside" source of power. Of course, it soon became a common combination so the term "motorcar" kinda, sorta, pretty much still applies. I guess this would make the horse an "engine" by daffynition.

    F

    F


  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 3,609Senior Contributor
    I was pulling your chain Frank!
  • FrankvintagefullflowcomFrankvintagefullflowcom Posts: 929Senior Contributor

    So that's what that was!

    Happy motoring!

    Frank

  • LanceBLanceB Posts: 687Senior Contributor
    All good explanations.  Now how about tire and wheel?
  • GeoffGeoff Posts: 3,609Senior Contributor

    So that's what that was!

    Happy motoring!

    Frank

    Don't you mean happy engining?  As for tires, We of the Imperial set of course refer to "Tyres", otherwise we would tire of the subject.
  • FrankvintagefullflowcomFrankvintagefullflowcom Posts: 929Senior Contributor
    I give up......
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