Help please for a first timer across the pond

billyboybillyboy Member
in HUDSON Posts: 6
Hello Folks out there, this is Bill from England. I have at last identified a Hudson in an auction next month which I am desperate to buy. Can anyone please give me some buying tips and information on the Terraplane as this would be the first one I have tried to buy. Hopefully the link to the advert is below - all help gratefully received, many thanks. One of the things I cannot find is the overall length of the vehicle. Link here www.swva.co.uk/classic-car/hudson-essex-terraplane-1935/  

Comments

  • RichardDRichardD Member
    edited March 20 Posts: 363
  • Jon BJon B Administrator
    edited March 20 Posts: 6,611
    Bill, the car looks very good and (as far as the photos show) seems to be quite original, with the exception of the headlights.  (Google "1935 Terraplane" to see what the original lights should be.)  The lights and possibly other components on the car, may be unique to British-built Terraplanes, however.

    If you buy it, you may want to join the Hudson-Essex-Terraplane Club, an active enthusiast's group with about 3,000 members worldwide.  It's a helpful resource when looking for parts, technical information or fellow 1935 owners.  Our roster shows 1935 Terraplane owners living in Kent, Lancashire, and Gloucestershire.  And I'm sure there are many others who are not currently Club members.

    As to the length: I don't have those figures for 1935 models, but based upon the dimensions of the nearly-identical 1934 models, I would guess as follows:

    "Special" model, series "G" (112" wheelbase, serial number starting "51---":  190" long
    "Deluxe" model, series "GU" (116" wheelbase, serial number starting "52---":  194" long


  • Geoff C., N.Z.Geoff C., N.Z. Senior Contributor
    Posts: 3,157
    Billy boy, I don't know how wealthy you are, but  the price seems to be a bit over-the-top!   Those headlamps do not do  much for the car, but otherwise it appears to be quite original.  Obviously 12-volted with British generator and regulator.  So it depends very much on how much you desire the car, and how much you are prepared to pay for it.   1935 in my opinion is nicest of all Terraplanes.
    Geoff 
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • billyboybillyboy Member
    Posts: 6
    i'm not good at this internet stuff fellas but so many thanks for the interest and I would like to know what to do with the lights - difficult decision as my garage is only 197 inches - retiring this year, bored with my old cars, MG, Triumph etc etc just love the Art Deco look
  • billyboybillyboy Member
    Posts: 6
    think i'll just buy it and join the club
  • Geoff C., N.Z.Geoff C., N.Z. Senior Contributor
    Posts: 3,157
    The headlights were quite a bit smaller, and more bullet shaped.  I'm sure you will find something that look better.  By all means  buy it if you can afford it, and certainly join the club.  There are a number of members in Britain .  I'm in N.Z. so not much help I'm afraid, couldn't get much further away!
    Geoff 
    If you're stuck in a hole, stop digging.
  • charles4dcharles4d Expert Adviser
    Posts: 326
    Bill even if you don't  buy it you can still join the club.
    You may find a dream car with history about it so you know who drove it and all the other  goodies about it. 
    In any case good luck it a nice looking car
  • PaulButlerPaulButler Administrator
    Posts: 719
    Bill , it's a lovely looking car indeed.

    I think that the price on it is a little high to be honest but if you like it then by all means bid on it. You would have a lovely  car to use and would get many years of fun out of it.

    30's Hudsons are "rare" in the UK; they do hit the market sometimes but are few and far between. This one is really nice; if I were looking to buy it then personally I'd be looking at around £15k or so but any car is worth what anyone would pay for it of course :)

    I'd be happy to have a chat about UK Hudsons in general if you like as I'm UK based myself so I'll PM you my phone number

  • billyboybillyboy Member
    Posts: 6
    Thanks Fellas, really good to hear all your comments - mostly positive I must say. I am a little scared of buying an 'American' car as I've been very much a Brit sports car guy having rebuilt a lot of them. but this car is so beautifully designed I am really drawn to it but know very little about reliability and parts etc. Seeing it next week  -now getting older so want to spend less time on the garage floor!! will let you know

  • billyboybillyboy Member
    Posts: 6
    thanks Paul would love to chat before viewing - cheers
  • Jon BJon B Administrator
    edited March 23 Posts: 6,611
    This would definitely NOT have a "sports car" ride.  However, even though it's an American car, it would be tighter and less "wallowing" than American cars of the 40's and 50's.  It has a solid front axle with leaf springs (unless it came with Axle-Flex), and a worm steering gear, not rack and pinion.  So if you're serious about the car, do ask for a test drive before you make a decision.  It is a very nice design (except for those aftermarket headlights, LOL!) but if you plan to do any driving in it, you definitely need to know what you're getting into before you buy.

    I don't mean to discourage you, just point out all the considerations you should make.  In fact, I've owned my 1937 for 46 years now, and have put maybe 60,000 miles on it but locally and on trips as long as 1500+ miles.  You may have an initial driving impression of something completely foreign to what you're used to in a more modern car.  Steering, "ride", cornering, stopping and acceleration -- even your height off the ground -- will seem strange in comparison to the newer cars you've owned.  Even such things as learning how to sight over the radiator to find your place on the road, will temporarily challenge you.  This is no Ferrari. But once you have driven it around a bit and gotten the "feel" of the car, you'll find it's quite second-nature to you.  I transition from my 2007 Ford Focus into my 80-year-old Terraplane with ease, and adjust myself unconsciously to driving in a 1930's mode.

    No doubt you already make this mental transition yourself, though on a less-radical scale, every time you jump from your modern car into your Triumph.
  • billyboybillyboy Member
    Posts: 6
    thanks Jon that's sound advice
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